Dwarfcichlid.com 

Practical Information About Keeping, Breeding and Buying Dwarf Cichlids

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Fish Profiles & Photos
South American  
Apistogramma
    agassizii
    atahualpa
    baenschi
    borellii
    cacatuoides
    commbrae
    geisleri
    gephyra
    gibbiceps
    hongsloi
    iniridae
    macmasteri
    ortmanni
    panduro
    paucisquamis
    pertensis
    rubrolineata
    sp. "Abacaxis"
    sp. "Putumayo"
    sp. "Steel Blue"
    steindachneri
    uaupesi
    xingu

West African 
Nanochromis
   parilus
   transvestitus
Pelvicachromis
    pulcher
    roloffi
    subocellatus
    taeniatus



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Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis

Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis male behind Apistogramma panduro female    The fish in the back is a male Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis. In front is a female Apistogramma panduro. These fish were displaying aggressively towards each other. You can clearly see the difference in the number of anal fin spines in this photo.
   Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis (A100) is often called the T-bar cichlid in older aquarium literature. It is the only species in the Genus Apistogrammoides and is very closely related to the Apistogrammas. However, Apistogrammoides normally have 8 spines in their anal fin while Apistogrammas typically have only 3.

        Apistogrammoides are found in the upper areas of the Amazon basin in Peru and Columbia. They are normally found in soft to extremely soft water. They are kept in typical South American dwarf cichlid fashion.
 
     Apistogrammoides are rather small fishes with males rarely reaching more than 2 1/2 inches in length. However, they can be rather aggressive and a territorial male can spell trouble for other fishes.To reduce aggression be sure to have a complex environment with plenty of plants, caves and other hiding places. They reproduce in typical fashion with the female laying her eggs in a cave or other secure hiding spot. The eggs hatch in three to four days and the fry are free swimming  in four to six more days.
Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis male   Apistogrammoides pucallpaensis young male
   
         I have found these beautiful fish to be a fairly difficult species. There is a lot of aggression, pair bonding can be difficult, often females are poor brooders and the fry are smaller than most dwarf cichlids. I rarely have large broods of this fish but have maintained them for a number of years.












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